Delicious + Nutritious Dressing to Fit Any Foodie Occasion

The term ‘yeast’ may sound like it should be on a list of uncomfortable words. When it comes to nutritional yeast, this food jazzer is something you might actually crave more of…

IMG_0277

During a recent DIY dressing experiment, I stumbled upon something wonder-filled.

With a slightly nutty-cheesy flavour, nutritional yeast is a versatile vegan star in salad dressings, creamy sauces or even drizzled over popcorn with coconut oil. Unlike Brewer’s yeast, the nutritional variety is gloriously gluten-free.

Grown on molasses and sugar cane, nutritional yeast comes from an organism of fungi known as Saccharomyces Cerevisiae. When harvested, it becomes deactivated and unable to perform as a leavening agent like other yeasts.

With nutrition headlines of raging candida out there, nutritional yeast ironically doesn’t promote candida overgrowth in our gut. As we know, gut flora is usually thrown off balance by undesirable bacteria feeders like refined junk food, sugar, wheat, caffeine, dairy, antibiotics and booze. Such is life.

Some added benefits of nutritional yeast include B complex vitamins (glucose metabolism and stress), complete protein (18 amino acids), fiber and trace minerals such as iron, selenium and zinc.

Engevita is a popular brand on the market, and my local grocery store sells it in bulk from Left Coast Organics. I find it bares a slight resemblance to old dry flaky skin. Salivating yet?

Given the probiotic prowess of fermented foods, adding miso paste to your dressing will make it even more tasty and dynamite for gut health.

Here’s a little recipe inspired from HollyHock‘s famous dressing:

Get ’em organic when you can…

1/2 cup nutritional yeast (~10 g carbohydrate, 12 g protein, 6 g fiber, 1 g fat)
1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
1/3 cup low sodium gluten-free Tamari
1 teaspoon brown rice genmai miso paste (like Amano brand)
1/2 cup water
3/4 cup extra virgin oil (like olive or grapeseed)
A pinch of love

Blend all ingredients except for the oil. Gradually add oil at the end to prevent oxidation. Store in an airtight glass container for up to 2 weeks.

Without fully divulging my affinity for cheesy chick flicks, there’s a Sisterhood of the Traveling Dressing thing happening here. It actually fits with almost any food imaginable. As a dipping sauce, it’s a real taste bud (and student budget) pleaser.

IMG_0278

Enjoy! xo

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s